Health Services

Contact Us

Amy Juchatz, MPH

Environmental Toxicologist

Suffolk County Department of Health Services
3500 Sunrise Highway, Suite 124
P.O. Box 9006
Great River, New York 11739-9006

631-854-0087

Cancer Prevention and Health Promotion Coalition

Cancer Prevention and
Health
Promotion Coalition Logo

Our Mission

The mission of the Suffolk County Cancer Prevention and Health Promotion Coalition is to provide actionable information to residents regarding healthy lifestyles and environmental risk factors in order to prevent cancer and other chronic diseases.  The Coalition also seeks to increase access to care for all county residents by providing education and outreach.

Our Vision

The vision of the Suffolk County Cancer Prevention and Health Promotion Coalition is to improve the lives of county residents by creating a healthier community in which cancer and other chronic diseases are minimized.


Tip of the Month

March 2017

Don’t Die of Embarrassment; Bottoms up!

Are you over 50? If so, check that you are up to date on screening for colorectal cancer.

In addition to getting screened, you should know the symptoms of colorectal cancer, and how to reduce your risk.

Symptoms of colorectal cancer include:

  • diarrhea or constipation
  • blood in the stool
  • narrower stool than usual
  • fatigue
  • frequent cramps, gas pains, or bloating
  • unexplained weight loss
  • nausea/vomiting

Colorectal cancer can be prevented with healthy habits such as maintaining a healthy diet (high in fiber, fruits, and vegetables, and low in fat), maintaining a healthy weight, engaging in physical activity, avoiding tobacco products, and limiting alcohol consumption.

Want to walk through a giant inflatable colon? Click here to learn more.

 

 

MONTHLY HIGHLIGHT

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month - Have you been screened?

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Colorectal cancer can occur at any age, but it is more common in adults over the age of 50. Fortunately there are several screening tests that can be used to detect and sometimes even prevent colon cancer from occurring. Screening is important because survival rates are much better if colon cancer is found at an early stage: the five year survival rate for early stage colorectal cancer is over 90 percent, but when colon cancer is detected at a late stage, the rate drops to 5 percent.

There are several types of colorectal cancer screening options. Talk with your doctor about the best option for you.

  • Blood stool test: A stool sample is collected at home, submitted to a lab, and checked for blood or genetic indicators of cancer. This test is generally recommended once a year if used as the only type of screening.
  • Sigmoidoscopy: A physician uses a tube to look inside the rectum and lower third of the colon for polyps and other abnormal tissues. If used as the only form of screening, this test is generally recommended every 5 years for people at average risk.
  • Virtual Colonoscopy- This test uses X-rays to produce images of the entire colon, which are analyzed by a physician using a computer. This test is recommended every 5 years for people at average risk.
  • Colonoscopy: The entire colon and rectum is examined during this procedure. During this examination, doctors can remove most polyps and some cancers. A colonoscopy is recommended every 10 years for people at average risk, or as a follow-up test if anything unusual is found during one of the other screening tests.

Resources:

Screening is not the only way to prevent colorectal cancer. According to the American Institute for Research on Cancer, 50% of US colorectal cancers (about 68,400 cases) could be prevented by eating healthy, being active and maintaining a healthy weight. To learn more, visit:

http://www.aicr.org/continuous-update-project/colorectal-cancer.html

If you are uninsured or underinsured, the Cancer Services Program can help you receive the screening you need. For the Suffolk County Cancer Services Program please contact (631) 548-6320.

For more information view/print the Colorectal Cancer Palm Card located below this highlight, or visit:

http://www.cancer.gov/types/colorectal/screening-fact-sheet or

https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/basic_info/screening/tests.htm.